One year in, one year to go

Ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) in 2013.

While I have been experimenting with camera traps in south Trinidad for several years now, my methods were relatively haphazard – the strategy was more or less just to drive about and pick some patch of forest that looked interesting. The positive results of 2012’s trap sessions in the Victoria Mayaro Reserve encouraged me to […]


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The Moth Trap

Tolype primitiva

Unfortunately I have not been able to spend as much time on this website as I would have liked. Looking back I am amazed that there was a time that I updated it every month! But being busy doesn’t mean that you stop being a naturalist. It just means that you have to find creative […]


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Asa Wright’s Legacy

One of my fond memories as a child was reading an article written by Williams Davis Jr. which appeared in an issue of the Trinidad Naturalist magazine. The article resonated with me for whatever reason and I would treat myself to reading it on a rainy day, imagining that I was there. It spoke of […]


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Butterflies of Trinidad: Forest Edge & Shade

Illioneus Giant-Owl (Caligo illioneus)

This is the second in the series of Quick Guides to deal with Trinidad’s common butterfly species. The species listed below are usually found in shady, well vegetated areas including, but not limited to, the forest undergrowth and along forest trails. Some species may also be attracted to gardens if a similar moist and shady […]


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Birds of Tobago: Home and Garden 1

Rufous-vented Chachalaca (Ortalis ruficauda)

This is the first Quick Guide highlighting Tobago’s common garden bird species. The birds listed here are all well suited to life in residential and urban areas in addition to their natural habitat. Many are generalists, meaning that they can survive on a variety of foods (their diet) and live in a range of habitats, […]


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A Tale of Two Forests

Demarcation between teak and seasonal forests in Cat's Hill, Trinidad

Forest environments vary widely in their capacity to attract and sustain wildlife. From the dry scrub forests of the north-west to the moist lowland forests in the south-east, Trinidad can boast of a wide range of these forest communities and, by extension, an impressive menagerie of wildlife.  Cat’s Hill offers two very distinct forest types. […]


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Birds of Trinidad: Home and Garden 2

This is the second Quick Guide highlighting Trinidad’s common garden bird species. The birds listed here are all well suited to life in residential and urban areas in addition to their natural habitat. Many are generalists, meaning that they can survive on a variety of foods (their diet) and live in a range of habitats, […]


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Known Unknowns

“We also know there are known unknowns; that is to say, we know there are some things we do not know”- Donald Rumsfeld There are a lot of natural and modified environments in Trinidad and Tobago and observing wildlife in these areas can be very difficult as anyone who spends time in our forests, savannahs […]


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Treasures in the bush

Orange-winged Parrot (Amazona amazonica)

For the last few weeks I have been spending most of my free time in Rousillac. To be more specific, I have been exploring a stretch of “bush” bordering the Rousillac Swamp – a mixture of secondary forest, swamp edge, and semi-abandoned agricultural plots. It may not be a virgin tropical forest or some other […]


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The 2011 Christmas Bird Count

America Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla)

The annual Christmas Bird Count was held in Trinidad and Tobago on 2 January 2012. The count has traditionally been held at four locations in Trinidad – Asa Wright, Caroni Swamp, El Tucuche and Morne Bleu – and, as last year, I decided to join the Morne Bleu group. The day got off to a […]


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